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After Nathan's appearance on UmbraCoffee last week, I thought it would be good timing to release his Umbraco MVP questions and answers. 

Nathan will also be attending CodeGarden this year and will be a speaker. Be sure to check out his talk if you are attending. 

This years Umbraco MVP nomination are now open - If you would like to nominate someone as a potential MVP for 2020, have a read of this great blog over on Umbraco.com and submit your nominations.

 

 

Nathan Woulfe

Job Title: Web Architect
MVP Status:
Renewal

Twitter account:
@nathanwoulfe

Website / Blog: nathanw.com.au

How did you first hear about Umbraco CMS?

We were deep in a horrible implementation project and had been following Umbraco's v4 progress - ultimately we dumped the other vendor and moved into the OSS world. I'm not sure how he found Umbraco, but one of my colleagues mentioned it when we were considering leaping out windows as the implementation dragged on. After we convinced the internal powers-that-be that OSS wasn't something to avoid, we haven't looked back.

How long have you been part of the Umbraco community and what do you like / dislike about it?

I've been part of the community for five or so years, but increasingly active since the start of 2018. Spoke at a couple of conferences, jetted off to Codegarden a couple of times, met some awesome people. It's the people who use and contribute to Umbraco that build the community - the more differing views and experiences and backgrounds that we can throw into that boiling pot, the better product we'll all get to use.

Have you been to Codegarden? If yes, what did you think about it, if no, is there any reason why?

Made two trips to CodeGarden, and trying to work out how to make it a hat-trick. Compared to other events I've attended, CG is a whole different beast. It's big, and sometimes way over-the-top, but it's still warm and welcoming. (Since Nathan answered this question, he has been selected to speak at CG20 - the hat trick is on!)

How did it feel when you received the notification that you were being awarded an MVP award?

I figured Niels had confused me with another Nathan. Without sounding like a dickhead, taking a step back and looking at some of the cool stuff I'd been able to do using Umbraco, the recognition was deeply appreciated, and I feel like I earned it. It's not often that we get acknowledged for doing good work, so embrace it when you do.

Has being awarded the MVP made you look at things differently / has it changed anything in your day to day life e.g. asked to do more Umbraco talks? Asked more Umbraco questions at your workplace?

Honestly, not really - I was already leaned on pretty heavily because I knew more about Umbraco than anyone else in the office. That's fine by me, I've chosen to invest my time and energy in the CMS, and am happy to share what I've learned. I'd like to do more talks, to build myself into a better presenter, but Australia is pretty isolated from the rest of the community, so events usually involve long travel, which comes at a cost, both financially and time-wise.

If you could offer a new member of the community one bit of advice, what would it be?

Ask your stupidest, most basic questions, because they are not stupid, nor basic. People aren't smarter than you, they've just been around longer..

Tell us about 1 of your most favourite things whether it's a band, a colour, a bit of software you couldn't live without, an item of clothing, a book, anything but tell us why you love it so much.

I'm a Lego fiend, and this will probably enrage the purists, but I have no issue with buying bootlego sets from China, at a fraction of the RRP. And bonus fact, I find bleak, droning black metal the best background music when working.

What does a typical day look like for you during the working week?

I'm usually in the office between 8.30 and 9am, and back out the door for coffee before 9.30. We work to a monthly (usually) release cycle, so depending on where we're at in that cycle I'll be working on delivering features/fixes, testing or scoping the next release. There's usually plenty of interruptions through the day so if I can grab a few consecutive hours to smash out some code, it's a good day. Out the door for the day around 4.30, definitely no work in the evenings (no day-job work at least, always other contract/project work to get sorted)

What do you do in your spare time? Hobbies?

I've played guitar since I was 12, but don't get enough time any more. We're coming back into summer, so will be spending as much time as possible at the beach with the kids.

 

About the author

Owain

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Where to find Owain

Twitter: @ScottishCoder
Linkedin: Owain Williams
Our: Our Umbaco